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Home » Research » List of Journals & Articles » Social Studies Journal Articles - Page 3

Social Studies Journal Articles - Page 3

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Sim, J. B.-Y. (2001). The development of social studies in Singapore secondary schools. Teaching and Learning, 22(2), 74-82.

ABSTRACT. Social studies is introduced as a new compulsory and examinable subject in all Singapore secondary schools at the upper secondary level in 2001. It will be examined for the first time at both the Singapore- Cambridge General Certificate of Education 'Normal' and 'Ordinary' Levels (GCE 'N' and '0' Levels) in 2002. Social studies was conceived in the context of National Education. The purpose is to enhance students' understanding of the key issues central to Singapore's survival and success. This article examines the development of social studies in Singapore secondary schools at the upper secondary level. Interviews were conducted with teachers and students in 20 schools in Singapore on the initial teaching and learning of social studies; the findings and its pedagogical implications will be discussed.

Sim, J. B.-Y. (2008). What does citizenship mean? Social studies teachers' understanding of citizenship in Singapore schools. Educational Review, 60(3), 253-266.

ABSTRACT. One of the challenges of teaching citizenship is that it can be understood in a variety of quite different ways. Singapore has a centralized education system, where political leaders wield direct influence over citizenship education. Social studies is a major vehicle for citizenship education, with a focus on nationbuilding. The official discourse on citizenship, while clearly articulated, has still to be implemented by teachers. In a context made complex by globalizing forces, how do teachers understand citizenship? This article reports on social studies teachers’ understandings of citizenship in Singapore schools. The study utilized a qualitative case study approach of eight teachers to provide depth and insight into their understanding. Findings revealed four themes, namely identity, participation, awareness of the nation’s past, and thinking citizenry, located within the nationalistic, socially concerned and person oriented stances. This reflected a citizenship education landscape in Singapore that, despite tight controls, was not rigid, prescriptive or homogenous.